>


Welcome to CorvettePage.com.
The Information Source for Corvettes

C1 - 1953 to 1962
1953 1954 1955
C2 - 1963 to 1967
1963 1964 1965
C3 - 1968 to 1982
1968 1969
C4 - 1984 to 1996
1984 1985 1986
C5 - 1997 to 2004
1997 1998
C6 - 2005 to 2013
2005 2006
ZR1 - The All-New 2009 Corvette ZR1
* Detroit Auto Show Images
* Added 1-16-08
C7 - the Future Corvette

SponsorsLinks
The Corvette
Black Book
Welcome to CorvettePage.com.
The Information Source for Corvettes

C1 - Corvette 1953 thru 1962

Who would have imagined following the 1953 GM Motorama a show car would spawn one of the longest lasting nameplates? The car is called Corvette.

The first generation of Corvettes, 1953 to 1962, are referred to as the "straight axle" cars, noting they had solid rear axles, rather than an independent rear suspension.

The initial three years can genuinely be called "roadsters", a term that is still applied to Corvette convertibles. What made the 1953-55 cars real roadsters was the lack of roll-up side windows.

The first generation of Corvettes saw manual transmissions supplementing the Powerglide automatics, first as three-speeds, then as four. The inline six with tripple Carter side draft carburetors was replaced by Ed Cole's small block topped by a single four barrell, dual fours, and finally fuel injection.

During the first generation production run, 69,015 Corvettes were built in thirty-two different colors. Horsepower climbed from from 150 horsepower in 1953 to an outrageous 360 by 1962 with engine displacements starting at 235 ci in 1953, moving up to 265 ci in '55, bumping up to 283ci in 1957, reaching its zenith of 327 ci in 1962.

1953 - The Motorama Special
1954 - Continuation
1955 - Ed Coles Magic V-8
1956 - Sports Car Renewed
1957 - Fuelies and Four Speeds
1958 - Longer, Lower, Wider
1959 -
1960 -
1961 - Ducktails become fashionable
1962 - The Imortal, the 327

C1 - 1953 to 1962
C2 - 1963 to 1967
C3 - 1968 to 1982
C4 - 1984 to 1996
C5 - 1997 to 2004
C6 - 2005 to 2013
C7 - The Future Corvette - 2014 to ?

"CorvettePage.com is not affiliated with, Associated with, or Sponsored by General Motors or the Chevrolet Motor Division."

Photos General Motors and by the Author